Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the whole story below. . . . Millions of trees in Colorado died in the 2000's decade, but not just because the Pine Bark Beetle larvae were seeking food in their life cycle. Rather, the trees became stressed and weak from climate change conditions such as at least 9 prior years of summer drought, long-time fire suppression policies resulting in tree overcrowding, and warmer winters allowing more beetle larvae to survive.
Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the whole story below. . . . 
Millions of trees in Colorado died in the 2000
This is a dead Lodgepole Pine tree in Fraser, Colorado, not far from Winter Park Ski Area. The bark has weathered off the trunk. You can see the tracks from the Pine Bark Beetle larvae's tunneling for food. When many larvae tunnel, the tree dies because it disrupts the circulation system.
This is a dead Lodgepole Pine tree in Fraser, Colorado, not far from Winter Park Ski Area. The bark has weathered off the trunk.  You can see the tracks from the Pine Bark Beetle larvae
November, 2007. Dr. Jim Conroy started his test treatments on many sites in Colorado. This magnificent Lodgepole Pine in front of Leslie's home in Fraser, CO, will represent the sites in the Winter Park/Fraser, CO, area for this example. Please see other examples throughout our suite of websites.
November, 2007.  Dr. Jim Conroy started his test treatments on many sites in Colorado.  This magnificent Lodgepole Pine in front of Leslie
May, 2008. This tree had already been "hit" by Pine Bark Beetles in previous years, but was putting on good growth candles for the new year. All of the spring treatments at the test sites in May of 2008, revealed that the circulation systems and photosynthesis (food-making processes) of all Lodgepole Pines treated was severely blocked--but not just by beetle larvae. Rather, the blockages were malfunctions that accumulated inside the trees' physiology.
May, 2008.  This tree had already been "hit" by Pine Bark Beetles in previous years, but was putting on good growth candles for the new year. All of the spring treatments at the test sites in May of 2008, revealed that the circulation systems and photosynthesis (food-making processes) of all Lodgepole Pines treated was severely blocked--but not just by beetle larvae. Rather, the blockages were malfunctions that accumulated inside the trees
October, 2008. Leslie, one of the homeowners in Fraser, CO, told of the constant sound of chainsaws all summer around the town. She added that people felt it was a very bad "beetle fly" year. However, her tree, "Beacon" still looked green and robust. All of Dr. JIm's test sites showed robust growth on trees that were able to regain healthy functionality from Dr. Jim's hands-on, bioenergy healing Green Centrics™ treatments. No products were used whatsoever.
October, 2008.  Leslie, one of the homeowners in Fraser, CO, told of the constant sound of chainsaws all summer  around the town.  She added that people felt it was a very bad "beetle fly" year.  However, her tree, "Beacon" still looked green and robust.  All of Dr. JIm
June, 2009. "Beacon" made it through winter again. The trunk shows signs of a beetle hit and some aging, However, it is not covered with the pitch holes and dripping sap typical of some trees that get beetle hits. Dr. Jim's bioenergy healing treatments in spring of 2009 reinforced the trees' overall health and focused on their circulation systems again.
TTW-stories-ae-cobeacon06
June, 2009. Look at the beautiful new growth candles! Growth is everything to a tree since it shows that photosynthesis, circulation, and cell division (to name only a few inner processes) are working more effectively again after Dr. Jim's Green Centrics™ and Co-Existence Technollogies® treatments.
June, 2009.  Look at the beautiful new growth candles!  Growth is everything to a tree since it shows that photosynthesis, circulation, and cell division (to name only a few inner processes) are working more effectively again after Dr. Jim
October, 2009. This tree and hundreds of others on Dr. Jim's test sites in Winter Park/Fraser, CO, were still green. This was no small accomplishment since millions of other Lodgepole Pines on other people's properties and on federal and state parklands were still dying.
October, 2009.  This tree and hundreds of others on Dr. Jim
October, 2009. Dr. Jim Conroy's treatments for the trees going into winter helped to prepare them for cold conditions. The trees would be able to better use their existing resources to get through the winter, to push out some of the larvae, and to have plenty of food remaining for lots of spring growth.
October, 2009.  Dr. Jim Conroy
June, 2010. Leslie's precious "Beacon" tree is looking great. Additional photos of Colorado test sites can be found on this suite of websites.
June, 2010.  Leslie
June 2010. "Beacon" and trees on the other properties show fantastic new growth candles. Robust growth is a sign of healthy internal functionality.
June 2010.  "Beacon" and trees on the other properties show fantastic new growth candles. Robust growth is a sign of healthy internal functionality.
June, 2011. Another year and "Beacon" and the other trees on the rest of the test sites are flourishing.
June, 2011.   Another year and "Beacon" and the other trees on the rest of the test sites are flourishing.
May 21, 2012. It's still cold and early in the season but the Beacon trees looks healthy.
May 21, 2012.  It
September 14, 2012. Leslie's Beacon tree made it through the summer with flying colors.
September 14, 2012.  Leslie
June 12, 2013. Leslie has been watering the Beacon tree with a clever contraption made out of an old garbage can. The spring was dry so Beacon needed extra moisture. It's multiple years of growth can be seen at tufts on the ends of each branch.
June 12, 2013.  Leslie has been watering the Beacon tree with a clever contraption made out of an old garbage can.  The spring was dry so Beacon needed extra moisture.  It

PLEASE CLICK THROUGH THE SLIDE SHOW ABOVE.

Chapter 12 of this book contains the whole story about the research in Colorado.

Lodgepole Pine & Pine Bark Beetle, Fraser, CO

Dr. Jim Conroy talks about “Beacon” and other trees on the Colorado test sites.

“When Marie met Basia and me at a Feng Shui exposition in New Jersey in 2007, she exclaimed: ‘I am so sad for our trees in Colorado.  They are all dying.  Won’t you please come out and help them.'”  And so we did.

“That autumn, Basia and I headed for the Winter Park/Fraser area as well as another famous ski town.  Marie rounded up her friends–among them was Leslie–and their properties became our test sites.  On our first trip, along the highways through the mountains, we saw horrible red and brown swaths of trees.  Lodgepole Pines were dying by the millions.   We were shocked and dismayed.”

Dr. Jim continues the story:  “By 2007, my Green Centrics™ and Tree Whispering® systems were well developed.  I had treated not only big old trees and landscapes, but also multi-acre farms and soybeans fields.  I was very good at what I did and trees almost always recovered health under my care.  But these properties were an order of magnitude larger.  I had to stretch myself and my systems in order to address the health of a whole ecosystem.  This was the beginning of the Cooperative BioBalance and Co-Existence Technologies® work.

“The Pine Bark Beetle is not the bad guy.  It gets the blame; it has been set up to take the fall.  But, it is only living its life as it has for milennia on all the West Coast mountains.  It’s been doing its job: living its own life and weeding out the weak trees.”

Basia interjects:  “What happened in Colorado in the mid 2000’s was a perfect storm.  All the Lodgepole Pine trees became weak due primary to years and years of summer droughts, the human policy of fire suppression, and other factors.  And, climate change has favored the beetle larvae’s survival through warmer than usual winters.  So, whole mountainsides of Lodgepole Pines were dying.

Dr. Jim talks about the die-off:  “You might think that this is a natural process.  Trees have gone through die-offs in the past but this is different.  First, it is happened much faster than has been seen in geologic time.  Second, many young trees are being ‘hit’ by the beetle and killed.  That means that even young trees are weak rather than vigorous.  And, third, my system is a permission-based system.  I always ask the deep intelligence within Nature for permission to do the bioenergy healing work.  I don’t force myself or my skills on any tree.  If I tried, it wouldn’t work anyway.  Permission is the key.

“So I ask permission of every tree I treat, including the Lodgepole Pines.  Since they have always given me permission during these trials, I feel that their deaths are not a natural process.  Also, I do a very specifically directed healing process; my work is not random application of “energies”.  I can tell that their deaths are not a natural process because of the specific connections and interconnections in their inner functionality that they direct me towards for their own healing.”

Dr. Jim reveals how the ecosystem really operates:  “Over the years of the test-sites study, I found them to be suffering from drought and other stresses totally separate from any effect of the beetles.  See, the beetles are just living their lives, so they seek weak and stressed trees to support their own life cycles.  When the trees regain inner health and synchronized functionality, the beetles are not attracted to them.  Beetles are primarily attracted to ALREADY sick trees.”

Dr. Jim continues: “I realized that part of rejuvenating the health of the trees, included addressing the needs of the beetle.  In a dynamically balanced ecosystem, both want to live and both need to survive.  Leslie’s beautiful tree, Beacon, showed me how to invite a certain kind of peace between Lodgepole Pines and the Pink Bark Beetle.  That “peace treaty”–or understanding of each living being’s needs–was the foundation of what I now call “EcoPeace Treaties.

Dr. Jim thanks all involved:  “I have an affinity for Beacon, and appreciate Marie for inviting us to Colorado and Leslie for being such a good host.  I also appreciate the other test site property owners for hanging-in there with us all these years.”

Note:  For photos of additional trees on test sites in Colorado, please go to the CooperativeBioBalance.org website.