Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the whole story below. . . . . May 29,2008. The acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO, shows red, dead, and dying Lodgepole Pine trees along the road. Dr. Conroy's holistic treatments just started the November prior, but trees that were already weak and "hit" by the Pine Bark Beetle would continue to die.
Please click to see the slide show. . . . . Read the whole story below. . . . . May 29,2008.  The acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO, shows red, dead, and dying Lodgepole Pine trees along the road.  Dr. Conroy
October 16, 2008. The acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO, still shows red, dead, and dying Lodgepole Pine trees along the road. However, Dr. Conroy's holistic treatments were at work to help still-green trees stay healthy and green.
October 16, 2008.  The acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO, still shows red, dead, and dying Lodgepole Pine trees along the road.  However, Dr. Conroy
2009. There is no new reddening. This means that the Lodgepole Pine trees are healthier and not succumbing to beetle larvae feeding activitiy.
2009.  There is no new reddening. This means that the Lodgepole Pine trees are healthier and not succumbing to beetle larvae feeding activitiy.
2010. A panorama of the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO. Note: no new reddening and the trees seem very green.
2010.  A panorama of the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO.  Note: no new reddening and the trees seem very green.
2011, the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO. No new reddening. The "silver ghosts" of long-dead trees are a bit more visible in this panorama.
2011, the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO.  No new reddening.  The "silver ghosts" of long-dead trees are a bit more visible in this panorama.
September 20, 2012. Brilliant autumn colors are contrasted against the solid green (no red) of the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO.
September 20, 2012. Brilliant autumn colors are contrasted against the solid green (no red) of the acreage on Route 8, Fraser, CO.
June 12, 2013. Spring green prevails at the Route 8 acreage again. The Lodgepole Pine trees are healthy despite the continued presence of the Pine Bark Beetle in the ecosystem.
June 12, 2013.  Spring green prevails at the Route 8 acreage again.  The Lodgepole Pine trees are healthy despite the continued presence of the Pine Bark Beetle in the ecosystem.

Chapter 12 of this book contains the whole story about the research in Colorado.

PLEASE CLICK THROUGH THE SLIDE SHOW ABOVE.

Fraser, Colorado EcoSystem: Lodgepole Pine Trees and Pine Bark Beetle

The Institute for Cooperative BioBalance Research Study Begins

After nearly a decade of summer drought, the Pine Bark Beetle had already been killing the weakened Lodgepole Pine trees in the Winter Park, Colorado, area by the time Dr. Jim Conroy, The Tree Whisperer®, and Ms. Basia Alexander, “Chief Listener” arrived to begin Tree Whispering®, Green Centrics™, and Co-Existence Technologies® bioenergy-based healing treatments in 2007.  Weak and reddened trees would die and become “silver ghosts.”

Trees that were green in 2008––the first full year of Dr. Jim Conroy’s hands-on bionergy-healing treatments––continued to be at risk of being ‘hit’ by the beetle and dying.  Even though the trees were green, their inner physiologies were still weak from a variety of stress factors in at least the previous decade.  Trees became stressed and weak from climate change conditions such as at least 9 previous years of summer drought, long-time fire suppression policies resulting in tree overcrowding, and warmer winters allowing more beetle larvae to survive.

“Scrape” gives a window into the trees

Every year the Lodgepole Pine trees on the research study properties grew and thrived.  The Pine Bark Beetle was still present in the forest and even present in the trees.  “Scrape” proves that the trees and the beetles were co-existing through 2013.

2013 Scrape series 511

“Scrape” is a tree on the edge of an area that the property owner cleared of other trees.  Often, when clearing, the cutter will drop a tree that scrapes another tree that is not intended to be cut down.  This injures the tree.  Thanks to Dr. Conroy’s holistic bioenergy treatments, the tree we call “Scrape” continues to thrive.

One small benefit from this injury was that it allowed the area just under the bark of the tree to be viewed. Notice that this young, small diameter tree, has tracks from feeding Pine Bark Beetle larvae.  At the same time, note that the tree has robust growth; no signs of reddening at all.  This shows that the Lodgepole Pines (even young ones) and the Pine Bark Beetle can co-exist in the ecosystem if both are healthy and in dynamic balance.

Co-Existence Technologies Treatments

Dr. Jim’s bioenergy-healing treatments would strengthen the trees’ inner parts, functions, and systems. The treatments were centered around improving the trees’ circulation systems and expanding the efficiency of cell division.

After wintering-over, in June of 2009, the treated trees showed little to no browning.  Rather, they had green foliage and good-sized new-growth “candles.”  Weak trees would be at risk again as the beetles normally fly and lay their eggs in more trees in late June/early July.  However, Dr. Jim’s bioenergy-healing work that spring would continue to strengthen the trees’ inner physiologies.

As the trees strengthen, they have less of risk of being severely “hit” or killed by the beetles.  Healthier trees do not attract the beetle.  Healthier trees and the beetle can co-exist in the ecosystem.

But more than that, the trees and the insects can co-exist through the use of Co-Existence Technologies and because of the principle of Live-and-Let-Live.

In June of 2010, the 3rd full year of bioenergy-based Green Centrics™ treatments begin.  The panoramic view below the property shows a few “silver ghosts” still standing, but the majority of trees are green and have robust growth.  Their healthier inner functions allow them to withstand the presence of a few beetle larvae under the bark and still survive and thrive.  The Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetles can co-exist.  Dr. Jim facilitates EcoPeace Treaties™ between the two life forms in the ecosystem.

As the 4th full year of treatments began in June of 2011, the continuing results are green.  Healthier trees continue to grow and withstand the presence of the beetle in the ecosystem.  The EcoPeace Treaty between the Lodgepole Pine trees and the Pine Bark Beetle is reinforced by Dr. Jim as he brings new developments into his Green Centrics and Co-Existence Technologies™ systems.   Please see the series of photos in the slide show above.